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U.S. 101

Bicycling on Old U.S. 101
San Diego County, California

Please e-mail comments, corrections and additions to the webmaster at pje@efgh.com.

Background | Directions for Southbound Bicyclists | Directions for Northbound Bicyclists

Background

Many years ago, motorists and bicyclists traveling between Los Angeles and San Diego had only one route to follow: U.S. 101, the famous Pacific Coast Highway.

As Interstate 5 was built, it replaced U.S. 101 in San Diego County. The old U.S. 101 signs were removed or moved onto Interstate 5. Eventually, all the U.S. 101 signs were removed.

However, much of the old highway remains; very little of it was actually obliterated when Interstate 5 was built. In a few places it has been closed to automobiles and remains open only to bicycles and pedestrians. In other places, it has, or has had, many names.

In 1997, the City of Encinitas put up some signs along its part of old U.S. 101 in recognition of its historic (and tourist) value:

SHIELD WITH COAST HWY 101

In May of 1998, the City of Oceanside put up similar signs along its part of old U.S. 101:

HISTORIC ROUTE U.S. HWY 101

The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad runs parallel to old U.S. 101 and quite close to it most of the way. The San Diego Coaster commuter train, which runs along this route between Oceanside and San Diego, offers roll-on bicycle access. Points of access to Coaster stations are noted in this description.

Amtrak also runs several trains per day along this route, with stops at Oceanside, Solana Beach and Downtown San Diego, but bicycle access is more restricted. Contact Amtrak for details.

South of the Old Town Transit Center, the San Diego Trolley Blue Line runs parallel to Old U.S. 101 and quite close to it. The Trolley also offers roll-on bicycle access, but there are restrictions. Click here for details.

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Directions for Southbound Bicyclists

Numbers indicate approximate distances, in miles, from the beginning of the route.

Map of Bike Route Through Camp Pendleton

00.00 - Enter a bike path on the south side of Cristianitos Road just west of the Cristiantos Road interchange with Interstate 5.

00.34 - The path dips to cross San Mateo Creek on a bridge used by U.S. 101 before Interstate 5 was built.

South of the creek, the path follows a part of U.S. 101 that is no longer open to automobiles. Starting near the Basilone Road exit from Interstate 5, it runs for a short distance on a separate path west of, and parallel to, Old Highway 101, which is still open to automobiles.

01.07 - The path emerges on Old Highway 101.

Follow Old Highway 101 south past the San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant. As the name suggests, this road was part of U.S. 101, but it now carries very little traffic because there is no outlet at the south end for automobiles. It has bike lanes in most places.

03.81 - Enter San Onofre State Beach.

Continue through San Onofre State Beach on another part of U.S. 101 which is used for access to campsites along the way. There are restrooms and drinking fountains near the road. On March 14, 1998, the campground was temporarily closed, but part of the area was still open for day use, and bicycle access was unimpeded.

07.05 - At the south end of the campground, pass around Gate 25 and continue south on a part of U.S. 101 that is normally used only by pedestrians and bicyclists.

08.82 - Turn left and pass through a tunnel under Interstate 5. Be alert when approaching the tunnel. It is subject to minor flooding when it rains, and it is occasionally used by military vehicles.

08.95 - Keep right right at a fork in the road. Do not take the branch that goes over a bridge! There are pavement markings to show you the way, but they are very faint, and you probably won't see them.

The path leads to a long, straight stretch of U.S. 101 that goes gently downhill to Las Pulgas Road. It is no longer open to automobiles. In most places, the pavement is old and rough. However, a half-mile stretch has been repaved for use as a practice landing strip by Camp Pendleton Marines. When the landing strip is in use, the path is closed, often with little or no prior notice.

If the path is closed, you have two options:

  1. You can wait, possibly the better part of a day, until the exercises are over and the path is reopened.
  2. If you are willing to risk a citation, you can detour onto Interstate 5. Turn around, go back through the tunnel under Interstate 5, and turn left into a side road. Follow it a short distance up to a small parking area. Then ride south on the shoulder of Interstate 5, watching carefully for debris. Take the first exit. Turn left at the end of the exit ramp onto Las Pulgas Road. Bicycles are normally not permitted on this part of Interstate 5, but the Highway Patrol may wink at violations when the bike path is closed.

10.38 - Go around Gate 22 into a small parking area.

10.40 - Turn left on Las Pulgas Road and follow it under the railroad tracks.

NOTICE: The bike route through Camp Pendleton was closed to civilians from September 11, 2001 to February 3, 2005.

10.71 - Pass a guardhouse at the entrance to Camp Pendleton. Bicycles are permitted in this part of Camp Pendleton, but --

  1. You must wear a helmet.
  2. All of the turns are well marked. You will have no trouble following the bike route. You will get into a lot of trouble if you don't.
  3. You must carry identification.

If you are unwilling or unable to ride through Camp Pendleton, you can go west on Las Pulgas Road and follow it to the Interstate 5 interchange. Then ride south on the shoulder of Interstate 5 to the Oceanside Harbor Drive exit, a distance of approximately 8 miles. Bicycles are permitted on this part of Interstate 5. The Interstate 5 route will take you through the Aliso Creek Rest Area, where food (from vending machines), water and rest rooms are available. It is about 1-1/2 miles shorter than the route through Camp Pendleton and it has gentler grades. However, riding next to high-speed freeway traffic is something that many bicyclists want to avoid.

10.71 - Keep right after leaving the guardhouse.

11.19 - Turn right onto Stuart Mesa Road.

18.19 - Turn right onto Vandegrift Blvd.

19.53 - Pass a guardhouse at the south entrance to Camp Pendelton.

Continue on the same road, which swerves to the west, passes under Interstate 5 and becomes Harbor Drive.

19.95 - Turn left onto Coast Highway, which is also called San Diego County Highway S21.

Map of Bike Route Through Oceanside

You can simply follow Highway S21 south for 24.4 miles, through Oceanside, Carlsbad, Leucadia, Encinitas, Cardiff, Solana Beach and Del Mar, in that order, and into San Diego. There are bike lanes in most places, and a separate bike path in one place (in Encinitas). Restrooms and drinking water are available at state and local parks next to the highway. However, there are three places where you may want to detour, as noted below.

A seaside route through Oceanside is very popular with bicyclists:

20.61 - Pass California Highway 76. (Highway 76 goes east to Fallbrook and Mount Palomar.)

20.80 - Pass Surfrider Way. If the Pacific Street causeway was impassible, you can take Surfrider Way west to Pacific Street.

21.25 - Pass Topeka Street. (The Oceanside Transit Center is one block to the west. The Coaster, Amtrak and many bus lines stop there.)

22.13 - Cross Oceanside Blvd.

23.12 - Cross Vista Way. This is where the alternate route described above rejoins Highway S21.

23.44 - Keep right as you enter the City of Carlsbad. Old U.S. 101 becomes Carlsbad Blvd.

Map of Bike Route Through Carlsbad

24.14 - Cross Grand Ave. (The Carlsbad Village Coaster station is one block to the east.)

27.27 - Pass the Palomar Airport Road exit. Stay on Highway S21 (unless you want to make a side trip to Palomar Airport).

28.29 - Pass Island Way. (This little street is a shortcut to the Carlsbad Poinsettia Coaster Station. Turn left on Island Way, then right on Franciscan Road. At the end of Franciscan Road is a sidewalk leading to the Coaster Station. There is a gate in it, but the gate is normally left unlocked. If the gate is locked, return to Old Highway 101 and continue south.)

28.70 - Pass Poinsettia Lane. (To reach the Carlsbad Poinsettia Coaster Station, take Poinsettia Lane east and Avenida Encinas north.)

30.16 - Pass La Costa Ave. and enter the Leucadia district of the City of Encinitas. Old U.S. 101 becomes N. Coast Hwy. 101.

Map of Bike Route Through Encinitas and Solana Beach

32.68 - Pass B Street (which goes to the west) and Encinitas Blvd. (which goes to the east). Enter downtown Encinitas. Old U.S. 101 becomes S. Coast Hwy. 101.

32.87 - Cross D Street. (The Encinitas Coaster Station is one block to the east.) The direct route through downtown Encinitas does not have bike lanes. You may want to detour as follows:

33.52 - Pass K Street. The detour described above rejoins Highway S21 here. Enter a bike path separated from the traffic lanes by a narrow berm. Enter a district of Encinitas called Cardiff by the Sea.

34.89 - Pass Chesterfield Dr.

35.09 - The bike path ends where the road crosses the outlet from San Elijo Lagoon. Continue south on a marked bike lane.

36.16 - Enter the City of Solana Beach. Old U.S. 101 becomes Coast Hwy 101.

36.90 - Cross Lomas Santa Fe Dr. The Solana Beach Coaster Station is one block to the east.

37.73 - Pass Border Ave. (which goes west) and Via de la Valle (which goes east). Enter the City of Del Mar. Old U.S. 101 becomes Camino Del Mar. Follow Camino Del Mar all the way through Del Mar.

There is an alternate route through Del Mar that you might want to take. It has much less traffic, and it is no longer than the regular route:

Map of Bike Route Through Del Mar and Torrey Pines

40.62 - Pass Carmel Valley Rd. Enter the City of San Diego. Old U.S. 101 becomes N. Torrey Pines Rd.

41.42 - Pass the entrance to Torrey Pines State Reserve. N. Torrey Pines Rd. swerves to the left and goes up a long hill. For a more scenic ride, enter the Reserve and follow a much narrower and steeper road, which is in fact an even older route for U.S. 101, through the Reserve. The road rejoins N. Torrey Pines Rd. at the top of the hill.

43.06 - At the top of the hill, pass Torrey Pines Science Park N. This is where the detour described above rejoins N. Torrey Pines Rd..

44.35 - Leave Highway S21 by turning right onto N. Torrey Pines Road. This intersection is a bit confusing, because the part of S21 that you have been riding on is also called N. Torrey Pines Road! (The road straight ahead is Genessee Ave.)

Map of Bike Route Through U.C.S.D and Rose Canyon

Follow N. Torrey Pines Road as it swings around the campus of the University of California at San Diego. U.S. 101 used to go right through the campus, but campus construction has obliterated nearly all of it. There are bike paths through the campus, but most of them are closed to bicycles when classes are in session, and they are difficult to follow if you are not familiar with the campus.

45.96 - Another confusing intersection. Torrey Pines Rd. goes to the right. Go straight ahead on La Jolla Village Dr.

46.30 Turn right onto Gilman Drive, which was another part of U.S. 101. Follow Gilman Drive down a long hill to an interchange with Interstate 5.

Ride very carefully past the entrance to southbound Interstate 5, especially when the traffic is heavy. Motorists entering Interstate 5 can make it difficult for a bicyclist to cross the entrance safely.

Pass under Interstate 5.

47.96 - On the other side, just beyond the exit from northbound Interstate 5, enter an unmarked bike path on your right.

Ride south along the bike path near the east side of Interstate 5, passing under Highway 52 and its interchange with Interstate 5.

49.05 - Emerge from the bike path at the north end of Santa Fe Street, which was part of U.S. 101.

Follow Santa Fe Street south. Although Santa Fe Street has no bike lanes, it does have ample shoulders in most places, and there is very little traffic because it has no outlet for motor vehicles at the north end.

51.08 - Turn right onto Damon Avenue and follow it under Interstate 5 to its end on Mission Bay Drive, which was part of U.S. 101.

51.33 - You could turn left here and follow Mission Bay Drive south, but the traffic is very heavy, there are no bike lanes, and the intersections with Balboa Ave. and Grand Ave. are especially dangerous for bicyclists. There is a much safer and easier route.

Cross Mission Bay Drive (using the pedestrian signal if necessary) and enter a bike path on the other side of the street.

Follow the bike path along the left bank of Rose Creek, passing under two bridges. Continue south until the bike path emerges on East Mission Bay Drive between a golf course and a boatyard.

52.15 - Turn left and follow East Mission Bay Drive south. To your left is Interstate 5, which has swallowed up part of U.S. 101. To your right is Mission Bay. Restrooms and drinking water are available near several of the parking areas to your right, and at the Mission Bay Visitor Information Center.

Map of Bike Route Past Mission Bay

54.97 - When East Mission Bay crosses Sea World Drive, it changes its name to Pacific Highway, which was part of U.S. 101, and bike lanes begin. Continue south on Pacific Highway and pass over Interstate 5.

55.98 - Cross Taylor Street (which goes east) and Rosecrans Street (which goes west). The Old Town Transit Center occupies the southeast corner of this intersection. Continue south on Pacific Highway and pass under Interstate 5.

Map of Bike Route through Downtown San Diego

You could follow Pacific Highway all the way to Downtown San Diego. This is an official bike route, but there is a serious problem with the direct route.

The place where the southbound lanes of Pacific Highway merge with the eastbound lanes of Barnett Ave. is extremely dangerous for southbound bicyclists. There is no bike lane. Motorists approaching the area from the west cannot see very far ahead because the road curves and there is a retaining wall next to the inside of the curve. Therefore, I strongly recommend an alternate route.

56.61 - Just after passing under a pedestrian overcrossing, and just beyond the intersection of Enterprise Street, keep right. Do not follow the bike route sign, which would direct you down into a short tunnel. Follow an unmarked transition road to the right. It will lead you to the north side of Barnett Ave. Follow Barnett Ave. west to the first traffic light.

56.90 - At the traffic light, dismount and use the pedestrian crossing to cross over to the south side of Barnett Ave.

56.94 - Get back onto your bicycle and ride east on the south side of Barnett Ave.

57.05 - Just before the lanes descend, switch to the sidewalk. Ride or walk your bike on the sidewalk until you reach a point where it is safe to return to the street (about 57.18).

57.73 - As you approach the place where Pacific Highway rises to cross Washington Street, take the Washington Street exit. Do not ride on the bridge.

57.87 - Cross Washington Street and continue straight ahead. The entrance ramp will take you back to southbound Pacific Highway.

58.85 - Pass Broadway in Downtown San Diego. The southernmost Coaster Station is one block to the east.

You may want to take a short side trip to Broadway Pier, where there are rest rooms. Just turn right at Broadway. Return to Pacific Highway by the same route.

59.15 - Turn left onto Harbor Drive, which was part of U.S. 101. Follow Harbor Drive southeast into National City. It has bike lanes in most places, although the pavement is quite rough in spots. Be especially careful when crossing railroad tracks.

Map of Bike Route Through National City, Chula Vista and San Ysidro

60.85 - Drinking water and rest rooms are available at Crosby Street Park. To make a side trip to Crosby Park, turn right at Crosby Street. Return to Harbor Drive by the same route.

63.03 - Enter National City.

63.92 - Where Harbor Drive ends, near an entrance ramp to southbound Interstate 5, turn left onto Civic Center Dr. Alternatively, you can turn right and follow the Bayshore Bikeway, which is a more scenic route. To return to U.S. 101, turn left on Palm Avenue and follow it to Beyer Blvd.

64.28 - Turn right onto National City Blvd., which was part of U.S. 101.

65.98 - Enter Chula Vista. Old U.S. 101 becomes Broadway.

70.22 - Cross over the Otay River and enter another part of San Diego, called San Ysidro. Old U.S. 101 becomes Beyer Blvd.

70.72 - Cross Palm Ave. Restrooms are available at Montgomery Waller Park, which occupies the southeast corner of Beyer Blvd. and Palm Ave.

71.94 - Pass under Highway 905.

72.03 - Turn right onto Dairy Mart Road.

72.53 - Turn left onto W. San Ysidro Blvd.

73.60 - West San Ysidro Blvd. becomes E. San Ysidro Blvd.

74.85 - Old U.S. 101 ended at the Mexican Border, next to the San Ysidro Trolley Station.

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Directions for Northbound Bicyclists

Numbers indicate approximate distances, in miles, from the beginning of the route.

Map of Bike Route Through National City, Chula Vista and San Ysidro

00.00 - Start at the Mexican Border, next to the San Ysidro Trolley Station in San Ysidro, which is actually a part of the City of San Diego. Go north on E. San Ysidro Blvd.

01.25 - E. San Ysidro Blvd. becomes W. San Ysidro Blvd.

02.32 - Turn right onto Dairy Mart Road.

02.82 - Turn left onto Beyer Blvd.

02.91 - Pass under Highway 905.

04.13 - Cross Palm Ave. Restrooms are available at Montgomery Waller Park, which occupies the southeast corner of Beyer Blvd. and Palm Ave.

04.63 - Cross over the Otay River and enter Chula Vista. Old U.S. 101 becomes Broadway.

08.87 - Enter National City. Old U.S. 101 becomes National City Blvd.

10.57 - Turn left onto Civic Center Dr.

10.93 - Pass under Interstate 5 and turn right onto Harbor Dr., which was part of Old U.S. 101. It has bike lanes in most places, although the pavement is quite rough in spots. Be especially careful when crossing railroad tracks.

11.82 - Enter San Diego again.

14.00 - Drinking water and rest rooms are available at Crosby Street Park. To make a side trip to Crosby Park, turn left at Crosby Street. Return to Harbor Drive by the same route.

15.70 - Turn right onto Pacific Highway, which was part of U.S. 101.

Map of Bike Route through Downtown San Diego

16.00 - Pass Broadway in Downtown San Diego. The southernmost Coaster Station is one block to the east.

You may want to take a short side trip to Broadway Pier, where there are rest rooms. Just turn left at Broadway. Return to Pacific Highway by the same route.

17.00 - As you approach the place where Pacific Highway rises to cross Washington Street, take the Washington Street exit. Do not ride on the bridge.

17.12 - Cross Washington Street. Turn left and then immediately turn right to re-enter northbound Pacific Highway. Alternatively, you can continue straight ahead and enter the Pacific Highway Frontage Road. It rejoins Pacific Highway about a half-mile to the north.

18.64 - Cross Taylor Street (which goes east) and Rosecrans Street (which goes west), just after passing under Interstate 5. The Old Town Transit Center occupies the southeast corner of this intersection. Continue north on Pacific Highway and pass over Interstate 5.

Map of Bike Route Past Mission Bay

19.65 - When Pacific Highway crosses Sea World Drive, it changes its name to East Mission Bay Drive. Continue north on East Mission Bay Drive. To your right is Interstate 5, which has swallowed up part of U.S. 101. To your left is Mission Bay. Restrooms and drinking water are available near several of the parking areas to your left, and at the Mission Bay Visitor Information Center.

22.47 - Near the end of East Mission Bay Drive, between a golf course and a boatyard, turn right into a bike path. Follow the bike path north along the east bank of Rose Creek, passing under two bridges.

Map of Bike Route Through Rose Canyon and U.C.S.D

23.29 - The bike path emerges near an intersection. Cross the street, using the pedestrian signal, and continue approximately straight ahead into Damon Ave. Follow Damon Ave. under Interstate 5.

23.54 - At the end of Damon Ave., turn left onto Santa Fe Street, which was part of U.S. 101. Although Santa Fe Street has no bike lanes, it does have ample shoulders in most places, and there is very little traffic because it has no outlet for motor vehicles at the north end.

25.57 - At the north end of Santa Fe Street, enter the Rose Canyon Bike Path. Continue north near the east side of Interstate 5, passing under Highway 52 and its interchange with Interstate 5.

26.66 - At the north end of the bike path, turn left, pass under Interstate 5, and continue north along Gilman Drive, which was part of Old U.S. 101.

28.32 - Pass under a bridge and turn left onto La Jolla Village Drive West. U.S. 101 formerly continued straight ahead, through what is now the campus of the University of California at San Diego. Most of the old highway has been obliterated by campus construction. There are bike routes through the campus, but they are hard to follow if you are not familar with them, and many are closed to bicycles when classes are in session.

28.66 - At the intersection of Torrey Pines Road, continue straight ahead on N. Torrey Pines Road. Follow N. Torrey Pines Road around the campus.

30.27 - Turn left to stay on N. Torrey Pines Road, which also becomes part of County Highway S21. You will be following this highway for about 25 miles. It changes its name as it passes through one city after another.

Map of Bike Route Through Torrey Pines and Del Mar

31.56 - At Torrey Pines Science Park N., you may want to take an alternate route through Torrey Pines State Reserve.

33.20 - Pass the entrance to Torrey Pines State Reserve. This is where the alternate route rejoins N. Torrey Pines Rd.

34.00 - Pass Carmel Valley Rd. Enter the City of Del Mar. Old U.S. 101 becomes Camino del Mar.

36.89 - Pass Border Ave. (which goes west) and Via de la Valle (which goes east). Enter the City of Solana Beach. Old U.S. 101 becomes Coast Hwy. 101.

Map of Bike Route Through Solana Beach and Encinitas

37.72 - Cross Lomas Santa Fe Dr. (The Solana Beach Coaster Station is one block to the east.)

38.46 - Enter Cardiff by the Sea, which is part of the City of Encinitas. Old U.S. 101 becomes S. Coast Hwy 101.

39.73 - Pass Chesterfield Dr.

41.10 - Pass K Street. This is the southern end of a popular detour for southbound bicyclists. Northbound bicyclists generally prefer to continue straight ahead through downtown Encinitas.

41.75 - Cross D Street. (The Encinitas Coaster Station is one block to the east.)

41.94 - Pass B Street (which goes to the west) and Encinitas Blvd. (which goes to the east). Old U.S. 101 becomes N. Coast Hwy. 101. Enter Leucadia, which is another part of the City of Encinitas.

44.46 - Pass La Costa Ave. and enter the City of Carlsbad. Old U.S. 101 becomes Carlsbad Blvd.

Map of Bike Route Through Carlsbad

45.92 - Pass Poinsettia Lane. (To reach the Carlsbad Poinsettia Coaster Station, take Poinsettia Lane east and Avenida Encinas north.)

47.35 - Pass the Palomar Airport Road exit. Stay on Highway S21 (unless you want to make a side trip to Palomar Airport).

50.48 - Cross Grand Ave. (The Carlsbad Village Coaster station is one block to the east.)

51.18 - Enter the City of Oceanside. Old U.S. 101 becomes Coast Highway.

Map of Bike Route Through Oceanside

51.50 - Cross Vista Way. Many bicyclists take an alternate route through Oceanside as follows:

52.49 - Cross Oceanside Blvd.

53.37 - Pass Topeka Street. (The Oceanside Transit Center is one block to the west. The Coaster, Amtrak and many bus lines stop there.)

53.82 - Pass Surfrider Way.

54.01 - Pass California Highway 76. (Highway 76 goes east to Fallbrook and Mount Palomar.)

54.67 - Turn right onto Harbor Drive. This is where the alternate route rejoins Highway S21.

Map of Bike Route Through Camp Pendleton

Pass under Interstate 5. Highway S21 ends here. The road becomes Vandegrift Blvd.

NOTICE: The bike route through Camp Pendleton was closed to civilians from September 11, 2001 to February 3, 2005.

55.09 - Pass a guardhouse at the south entrance to Camp Pendelton. Bicycles are permitted in this part of Camp Pendleton, but --

  1. You must wear a helmet.
  2. All of the turns are well marked. You will have no trouble following the bike route. You will get into a lot of trouble if you don't.
  3. You must carry identification.

If you are unwilling or unable to ride through Camp Pendleton, you can turn around and enter northbound Interstate 5. Then ride north on the shoulder of Interstate 5 to the Las Pulgas Road exit, a distance of approximately 8 miles. Bicycles are permitted on this part of Interstate 5. The Interstate 5 route will take you through the Aliso Creek Rest Area, where food (from vending machines), water and rest rooms are available. It is about 1-1/2 miles shorter than the route through Camp Pendleton and it has gentler grades. However, riding next to high-speed freeway traffic is something that many bicyclists want to avoid.

56.43 - Turn left onto Stuart Mesa Road.

63.43 - Turn left onto Las Pulgas Road. WARNING: As of July 9, 2000, there is still no bike route sign marking this turn, and northbound bicyclists sometimes miss it. Look for a WINDMILL near the intersection.

63.91 - Keep left and pass a guardhouse at the north entrance to Camp Pendleton.

64.22 - Turn right onto a section of Old U.S. 101 which is no longer open to motor vehicles. There is a small parking area here that is often used by recreational bicyclists.

64.24 - Go around Gate 22 and follow a long, straight section of Old U.S. 101 that goes gently uphill. It is no longer open to automobiles. In most places, the pavement is old and rough. However, a half-mile stretch has been repaved for use as a practice landing strip by Camp Pendleton Marines. When the landing strip is in use, the path is closed, often with little or no prior notice.

If the path is closed, you have two options:

  1. You can wait, possibly the better part of a day, until the exercises are over and the path is reopened.
  2. If you are willing to risk a citation, you can detour onto Interstate 5. However, this detour is much more difficult than the southbound detour.

65.67 - Keep left and pass through a tunnel under Interstate 5. Be alert when approaching the tunnel. It is subject to minor flooding when it rains, and it is occasionally used by military vehicles.

65.80 - After you emerge from the tunnel, turn right and keep following Old U.S. 101 north.

67.57 - Pass around Gate 25 and continue north through San Onofre State Beach. This part of Old U.S. 101 is now used only for access to campsites along the way. Restrooms and drinking fountains are available.

70.81 - Leave San Onofre State Beach and continue north on Old Highway 101, which is open to motor vehicles.

73.55 - Just before reaching the Basilone Road interchange with Interstate 5, you will notice a marked crosswalk. Cross Old Highway 101 here and pass through a gap in a fence to enter a bike path on the west side of the road.

74.28 - The path dips to cross San Mateo Creek on a bridge used by U.S. 101 before Interstate 5 was built.

74.62 - The bike path emerges on the south side of Cristianitos Road just west of the Cristiantos Road interchange with Interstate 5. Leave San Diego County and enter the City of San Clemente and Orange County.

The bike route continues north through San Clemente and up the coast as far as Long Beach.

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